Frequently asked questions

Here are the answers to some of our frequently asked questions.

If you cannot find the answer to your query here, please send us a message and we will reply to you as soon as possible and add your question to our list on this page. 

Why are girls asked to wear trousers (or shorts under their skirts) for the hospital visit?

Why do you give the children biscuits mid morning?

How can my school get involved with I.M.P.S.?

Why is it possible to let children walk around the emergency department in hospital?

Is it safe for my child to visit a hospital when they are well?

My child is not feeling well this morning, can they still attend their I.M.P.S. visit?

How much does the visit cost?

Is it safe for a child to learn how to use a defibrillator?

How do you know if children remember what they are taught?

Will my child have a first aid qualification?

How can a 10 year old put an adult in the recovery position?

Can independent schools get involved?

Do all the I.M.P.S. centres teach exactly the same information?

Why didn’t my child learn how to use a defibrillator during their visit to the hospital?

Are the I.M.P.S. trainers checked before they work with children?

Can I follow I.M.P.S. on social media?

 

Why are girls asked to wear trousers (or shorts under their skirts) for the hospital visit?

Much of the practical work is done on the floor and it is important that the children concentrate on what they are learning without worrying about showing their underwear.

Why do you give the children biscuits mid morning?

It is important to refuel the children mid-way through the practical session as they have a full morning of learning. We need to avoid children fainting during the sessions especially if it involves a visit to the emergency department where it can be quite warm and the lights very bright. Surprisingly, some children are not given breakfast in the morning before attending school. 

How can my school get involved with I.M.P.S.?

If you do not have a nearby I.M.P.S. centre, contact head office about our affiliated schools project.  This will provide many aspects of the programme to your school with the exception of the practical training element. 

Why is it possible to let children walk around the emergency department in hospital?

The children are taught throughout the morning by specially trained I.M.P.S. trainers who are not part of the emergency department staff. Although the children do enter the emergency department in some of our centres they do not come into contact with any patients or distressing events.  The benefits of visiting a hospital when well, help to reduce any fear a child may have about hospitals. A visit to the emergency department helps to add credibility to the skills that have been taught in the classroom setting. 

Is it safe for my child to visit a hospital when they are well?

Yes of course, we would never put a child or visitor at risk in any way. If on rare occasions there are issues with infectious diseases within the emergency department or hospital, the visit will be cancelled or relocated. 

My child is not feeling well this morning, can they still attend their I.M.P.S. visit?

If you would normally send your child to school for the day then it is probably alright for your child to attend an I.M.P.S. session. Bear in mind that the visit is long and requires a lot of interaction and concentration from your child. If you think your child may have an infectious illness or virus, or has been in contact with an infectious illness, please do not send them into a hospital environment.  

How much does the visit cost?

In the majority of I.M.P.S. centres the visit is free to schools. Some areas request payment from independent schools and many ask for a donation towards the visit. I.M.P.S. does not want any child excluded from learning emergency life skills due to cost, however, funding is always an issue with all I.M.P.S. centres.  Please contact your nearest I.M.P.S. office to ask about donations or fundraising opportunities.

Is it safe for a child to learn how to use a defibrillator?

It is perfectly safe for anyone to use a defibrillator (also known as an Automated External Defibrillator  AED). It is impossible to accidentally deliver an electric shock to yourself or the patient as the defibrillator is fully automated and tells you exactly what to do. 

How do you know if children remember what they are taught?

We have an evaluation online quiz and the children take part pre and post visit. These scores are collated and we can see that following the I.M.P.S. visit the children’s score goes up by an average of 12% correct answers. Studies taken 3 and 6 months post visit show that the retention of skills and knowledge is very high.  Contact head office in Oxford if you wish to be sent a copy of our study.

Will my child have a first aid qualification?

Your child will not have a first aid qualification, although a certificate is available to show the emergency life skills that have been learnt. Certificates are provided by individual centres and often are emailed to you following a training session. For Oxfordshire schools, you can download a class certificate or an individual pupil certificate online.  Contact your local I.M.P.S. centre to ask about a certificate of attendance. 

How can a 10 year old put an adult in the recovery position?

It’s all about levers!  It is quite possible for a child to move an adult by using the arms and legs as levers. Click here for more information about the recovery position.

Can independent schools get involved?

Yes in most areas, independent schools are welcomed. There may be a charge to cover costs if the funding is not provided to cover independent schools. Contact your nearest centre to ask for information. 

Do all the I.M.P.S. centres teach exactly the same information?

Due to our strict quality assurance and standards policies, all of the I.M.P.S. centres follow the same scripts for delivery of the sessions.  It is essential that basic information is delivered to fit within a very tight time frame.  There are always some local variations as some sessions are taught within local primary schools, whilst others are taught within the hospital setting. This is all due to the funding streams and local requirements. 

Why didn’t my child learn how to use a defibrillator during their visit to the hospital?

Following Resuscitation Council UK Guidelines it is recommended by I.M.P.S. head office in Oxford that all children should be taught how to use a defibrillator during an I.M.P.S. session.  Some centres have not yet adopted this element of the training session due to local reasons.  Defibrillator simulators are available for all I.M.P.S. centres to use as teaching aids.  Please contact your local I.M.P.S. co-ordinator if you have any further questions. 

” School-age children have been shown to be capable of using AEDs in simulated cardiac arrest scenarios, and all schoolchildren should be taught emergency life-saving techniques”  A guide to AED’s by Resuscitation Council (UK) and British Heart Foundation December 2013.

Are the I.M.P.S. trainers checked before they work with children?

All I.M.P.S. trainers are DBS checked prior to employment. It is recommended that all I.M.P.S. centres follow the I.M.P.S. child protection statement and that the Local Arrangements for Child Protection Guidelines are followed.

All schools are responsible for any adults who accompany the children on their I.M.P.S. hospital visit.  

Can I follow I.M.P.S. on social media?

Contact your local I.M.P.S. centre to find out if they are able to participate in social media posts. 

You can follow Oxfordshire on twitter and Facebook , Manchester on twitter  and Hull on facebook.

 

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